Dating a taiwan coin

There are additional Japanese symbols for larger multiples of 10: 100: 百 1000: 千 The Japanese number-writing system is known as a non-positional numeral system because individual symbols don't identify their value strictly based on their position in the number.For example, 40 (四十, 4 10), 400 (四百, 4 100), and 4000 (四千, 4 1000) all use exactly 2 symbols in Japanese (while the Arabic numbers 40, 400, and 4000 use 2, 3, and 4 respectively). This practice largely stopped after World War 2, and for most purposes Japan uses the same year as America would use.Or perhaps you have found an unusual coin in your change and would like to know more ab...Read More » rounds are shaped like coins but have no monetary value or date carved on them.The position of a symbol doesn't define its value; its effect on or by its neighbors does. Modern Japanese coins, however, use the Japanese era calendar to indicate when a coin was minted.More examples of Japanese numbers: 32: 三十二 44: 四十四 78: 七十八 99: 九十九 Japanese Dates In the late 1800s, Japan adopted the Gregorian calendar, but with a starting date (a "year zero") that corresponded to the Gregorian calendar's year 660 BC, making Japan's year values larger than the year used by other countries (i.e. An era starts counting years at 1 with each new Japanese emperor.For example, Heisei year 3 would correspond to 1991 (year 1 is 1989, year 2 is 1990, and year 3 is 1991).Here are the dates for the coins pictured above: Comparison to Taiwan Coins Coins from Taiwan use the same number symbols as Japanese coins, so it is easy to mistake them for each other.

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The current numbering system, from 1913 to the present, is based on BE dates (from Buddhas enlightenment in 543 BC). In the coin pictured here, the year reads 6 10 1 (61, in yellow highlighting) reading counter-clockwise and ending with the year symbol (年).Taiwan coins will of course not have one of the 4 Japanese emperor era names listed above, and frequently have the flower symbol shown here.While most coins are read right-to-left, some need to be read left-to-right (counter-clockwise).The symbol for year (年) is always at the end of the date, so if you see it at the left-hand end of a number, read it from right-to-left; if you see it at the right-hand end, read it left-to-right.

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